Max MSP for beginners – building a musical sequencer

Online workshop – Saturday 17 October – 4pm-6pm | £8/£5 student | Tickets: https://buytickets.at/iklectik/433726

If you cannot afford it, please drop us an email at info@iklectikartlab.com

35 participants max

 

Overview
The workshop is aimed at beginners of Max MSP and participants who have never used the program before. A 30 day demo can be downloaded from here: https://cycling74.com/downloads

About Max MSP
Max, also known as Max/MSP/Jitter, is a visual programming language for music and multimedia developed and maintained by San Francisco-based software company Cycling ’74. Over its more than thirty-year history, it has been used by composers, performers, software designers, researchers, and artists to create recordings, performances, and installations

Prerequisites
Members will need to have Max already installed prior to the workshop.

Aim
To teach the basics of Max MSP through building a musical step sequencer. The workshop will look at the fundamentals of how the program works and each user will have completed a patch in which music can be made!

About the pr​ovider
Tony James Morton is a musician, composer and sound artist whose work focuses on real-time systems aesthetics. These systems created have rules and structures, but within the confines of these boundaries there is enough room for improvisation, chance and probability. This allows for a different interpretation each time, creating unique experiences of sound.He studied Bsc Music Technology at Leeds Metropolitan University and MA byresearchin Music Composition at Birmingham University, where his interactive/reactive audio-visual installations centred around the use of Max MSP.His work has been displayed and performed at; OXO Tower Bargehouse (London, UK),IKLECTIK(London, UK), BEAST FEaST (Birmingham, UK) and Studio 47 (Amsterdam, Netherlands).He is a featured composer on the Steam Greenlight computer game “Exception,” and is credited for soundtrack mixing in the independent short film “The King,” by Frederic Casella.